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10.1016/j.jmii.2020.05.013

http://scihub22266oqcxt.onion/10.1016/j.jmii.2020.05.013
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32482366!7245213!32482366
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suck abstract from ncbi

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  • Co-infections among patients with COVID-19: The need for combination therapy with non-anti-SARS-CoV-2 agents? #MMPMID32482366
  • Lai CC; Wang CY; Hsueh PR
  • J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2020[Aug]; 53 (4): 505-512 PMID32482366show ga
  • Co-infection has been reported in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome, but there is limited knowledge on co-infection among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The prevalence of co-infection was variable among COVID-19 patients in different studies, however, it could be up to 50% among non-survivors. Co-pathogens included bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila and Acinetobacter baumannii; Candida species and Aspergillus flavus; and viruses such as influenza, coronavirus, rhinovirus/enterovirus, parainfluenza, metapneumovirus, influenza B virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Influenza A was one of the most common co-infective viruses, which may have caused initial false-negative results of real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Laboratory and imaging findings alone cannot help distinguish co-infection from SARS-CoV-2 infection. Newly developed syndromic multiplex panels that incorporate SARS-CoV-2 may facilitate the early detection of co-infection among COVID-19 patients. By contrast, clinicians cannot rule out SARS-CoV-2 infection by ruling in other respiratory pathogens through old syndromic multiplex panels at this stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, clinicians must have a high index of suspicion for coinfection among COVID-19 patients. Clinicians can neither rule out other co-infections caused by respiratory pathogens by diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 infection nor rule out COVID-19 by detection of non-SARS-CoV-2 respiratory pathogens. After recognizing the possible pathogens causing co-infection among COVID-19 patients, appropriate antimicrobial agents can be recommended.
  • |Anti-Infective Agents/*therapeutic use[MESH]
  • |Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification[MESH]
  • |COVID-19[MESH]
  • |COVID-19 Testing[MESH]
  • |COVID-19 Vaccines[MESH]
  • |Clinical Laboratory Techniques[MESH]
  • |Coinfection/diagnosis/*drug therapy/epidemiology[MESH]
  • |Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis/*drug therapy/epidemiology[MESH]
  • |Drug Therapy, Combination[MESH]
  • |Humans[MESH]
  • |Pandemics[MESH]
  • |Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis/*drug therapy/epidemiology[MESH]
  • |Practice Guidelines as Topic[MESH]
  • |Reagent Kits, Diagnostic[MESH]
  • |SARS-CoV-2[MESH]


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  • suck abstract from ncbi

    505 4.53 2020