Use my Search Websuite to scan PubMed, PMCentral, Journal Hosts and Journal Archives, FullText.
Kick-your-searchterm to multiple Engines kick-your-query now !>
A dictionary by aggregated review articles of nephrology, medicine and the life sciences
Your one-stop-run pathway from word to the immediate pdf of peer-reviewed on-topic knowledge.
garesp_yesshow ga

http://scihub22266oqcxt.onion/10.1590/1413-785220182605173445
suck pdf from google scholar
unlimited free pdf from europmc30464719    free
PDF from PMC    free
html from PMC    free
pmid30464719
Nephropedia Template TP

gab.com Text

Twit Text FOAVip

Twit Text #

English Wikipedia


  • FACTORS RELATED TO AMPUTATION LEVEL AND WOUND HEALING IN DIABETIC PATIENTS #MMPMID30464719
  • Baumfeld D; Baumfeld T; Macedo B; Zambelli R; Lopes F; Nery C
  • Acta Ortop Bras 2018[]; 26 (5): 342-345 PMID30464719garesp_yesshow ga
  • Objective: There are no specific criteria that define the level of amputation in diabetic patients. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of clinical and laboratory parameters in determining the level of amputation and the wound healing time. Methods: One hundred and thirty-nine diabetic patients were retrospectively assessed. They underwent surgical procedures due to infection and/or ischemic necrosis. Type of surgery, antibiotic use, laboratory parameters and length of hospital stay were evaluated in this study. Results: The most common amputation level was transmetatarsal, occurring in 26 patients (28.9%). The wound healing time increased with statistical significance in individuals undergoing debridement, who did not receive preoperative antibiotics and did not undergo vascular intervention. Higher levels of amputation were statistically related to limb ischemia, previous amputation and non-use of preoperative antibiotics. Conclusion: Patients with minor amputations undergo stump revision surgery more often, but the act of always targeting the most distal stump possible decreases energy expenditure while walking, allowing patients to achieve better quality of life. Risk factors for major amputations were ischemia and previous amputations. A protective factor was preoperative antibiotic therapy. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study.
  • ä


  • DeepDyve
  • Pubget Overpricing
  • garesp_yesshow ga

    342 5.26 2018