suck pdf from google scholar
unlimited free pdf from europmc18281716    free
PDF from PMC    free
html from PMC    free
PDF vom PMID18281716  :  Publisher
PDF vom PMID18281716
suck pdf from library genesis
English Wikipedia

Nephropedia Template TP (

Twit Text


  • DeepDyve
  • Pubget Overpricing


  • lüll
  • Fifteen years after "Wingspread"--environmental endocrine disrupters and human and wildlife health: where we are today and where we need to go
  • Hotchkiss AK; Rider CV; Blystone CR; Wilson VS; Hartig PC; Ankley GT; Foster PM; Gray CL; Gray LE
  • Toxicol Sci 2008[Oct]; 105 (2): 235-59
  • In 1991, a group of expert scientists at a Wingspread work session on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) concluded that "Many compounds introduced into the environment by human activity are capable of disrupting the endocrine system of animals, including fish, wildlife, and humans. Endocrine disruption can be profound because of the crucial role hormones play in controlling development." Since that time, there have been numerous documented examples of adverse effects of EDCs in invertebrates, fish, wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. Hormonal systems can be disrupted by numerous different anthropogenic chemicals including antiandrogens, androgens, estrogens, AhR agonists, inhibitors of steroid hormone synthesis, antithyroid substances, and retinoid agonists. In addition, pathways and targets for endocrine disruption extend beyond the traditional estrogen/androgen/thyroid receptor-mediated reproductive and developmental systems. For example, scientists have expressed concern about the potential role of EDCs in increasing trends in early puberty in girls, obesity and type II diabetes in the United States and other populations. New concerns include complex endocrine alterations induced by mixtures of chemicals, an issue broadened due to the growing awareness that EDCs present in the environment include a variety of potent human and veterinary pharmaceutical products, personal care products, nutraceuticals and phytosterols. In this review we (1) address what have we learned about the effects of EDCs on fish, wildlife, and human health, (2) discuss representative animal studies on (anti)androgens, estrogens and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-like chemicals, and (3) evaluate regulatory proposals being considered for screening and testing these chemicals.
  • |Adult[MESH]
  • |Animals[MESH]
  • |Animals, Wild[MESH]
  • |Child[MESH]
  • |Child Development/drug effects[MESH]
  • |Dose-Response Relationship, Drug[MESH]
  • |Ecosystem[MESH]
  • |Embryonic Development/drug effects[MESH]
  • |Endocrine Disruptors/*toxicity[MESH]
  • |Endocrine System/*drug effects[MESH]
  • |Environmental Exposure[MESH]
  • |Environmental Pollutants/*toxicity[MESH]
  • |Fishes[MESH]
  • |Government Regulation[MESH]
  • |Guidelines as Topic[MESH]
  • |Humans[MESH]
  • |Occupational Exposure[MESH]
  • |Reproduction/drug effects[MESH]
  • |Risk Assessment[MESH]
  • |Time Factors[MESH]
  • |Toxicity Tests/*trends[MESH]
  • |Toxicology/legislation & jurisprudence/*trends[MESH]





  • *{{pmid18281716}}
    *<b>[http://www.kidney.de/mlpefetch.php?search=18281716 Fifteen years after "Wingspread"--environmental endocrine disrupters and human and wildlife health: where we are today and where we need to go ]</b> Toxicol Sci 2008; 105(2) ; 235-59 Hotchkiss AK; Rider CV; Blystone CR; Wilson VS; Hartig PC; Ankley GT; Foster PM; Gray CL; Gray LE

        *18281716*

    Nephropedia PMID record

    Deutsche Wikipedia - im Artikel

    Hier den unten stehenden Textblock hineinkopieren

    Toxicol Sci

    235 2.105 2008